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Intrauterine Growth Restriction Alters the Genome-Wide DNA Methylation Profiles in Small Intestine, Liver and Longissimus Dorsi Muscle of Newborn Piglets

[ Vol. 20 , Issue. 7 ]

Author(s):

Shiyu Tao, Tianjiao Zhou, Perot Saelao, Ying Wang, Yuhua Zhu, Tiantian Li, Huaijun Zhou and Junjun Wang*   Pages 713 - 726 ( 14 )

Abstract:


Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) remains a major problem in swine production since the associated low birth weight leads to high rates of pre-weaning morbidity and mortality, and permanent retardation of growth and development. The underlying regulatory mechanisms from the aspects of epigenetic modification has received widespread attention. Studies explore the changes in genome wide methylation in small intestine (SI), liver and longissimus dorsi muscle (LDM) between IUGR and normal birth weight (NBW) newborn piglets using a methylated DNA immunoprecipitation-sequencing (MeDIP-Seq) approach. The data demonstrated that methylated peaks were prominently distributed in distal intergenic regions and the quantities of peaks in IUGR piglets were more than that of NBW piglets. IUGR piglets had relatively high methylated level in promoters, introns and coding exons in all the three tissues. Through KEGG pathway analysis of differentially methylated genes found that 33, 54 and 5 differentially methylated genes in small intestine, liver and longissimus dorsi muscle between NBW and IUGR piglets, respectively, which are related to development and differentiation, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, lipid metabolism, protein turnover, immune response, detoxification, oxidative stress and apoptosis pathway. The objective of this review is to assess the impact of differentially methylation status on developmental delay, metabolic disorders and immune deficiency of IUGR piglets.

Keywords:

IUGR, piglet, MeDIP-Seq, small intestine, liver, muscle.

Affiliation:

State Key Laboratory of Animal Nutrition, College of Animal Science and Technology, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193, State Key Laboratory of Animal Nutrition, College of Animal Science and Technology, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193, Department of Animal Science, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, Department of Animal Science, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, State Key Laboratory of Animal Nutrition, College of Animal Science and Technology, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193, State Key Laboratory of Animal Nutrition, College of Animal Science and Technology, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193, Department of Animal Science, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, State Key Laboratory of Animal Nutrition, College of Animal Science and Technology, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193

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